Affordability set to worsen

Belinda Luc

The NSW government’s decision to kill off special laws that fast-track projects is disappointing, according to the Urban Taskforce.

Chief executive officer Aaron Gadiel said the government’s decision to allow the National Building and Jobs Taskforce to expire is a shame because it was the only approvals system that was “refreshing” in its approach to the housing supply and affordability issue.

The National Building and Jobs Taskforce was originally set up as a government stimulus initiative to boost the Australian economy. NSW’s share of funding under the plan was valued at over $7 billion including $1.5 billion to non-government schools. With the wind-down of the stimulus, no further categories for building projects have been added to the plan.

“These public servants took a common sense approach to housing approvals,” Mr Gadiel said.

“It’s particularly disappointing that there is now no prospect of the system being extended to private sector projects,” he said.

According to Mr Gadiel, NSW property development has been in serious decline since 2002.

Mr Gadiel said he had hoped the findings of Dr Neil Shepherd’s review into the Nation Building and Jobs Plan would shine a light on problems in the state’s planning system.

“Clearly, more time is required before a government moves decisively on this issue,” he said.

 

Belinda Luc

The NSW government’s decision to kill off special laws that fast-track projects is disappointing, according to the Urban Taskforce.

Chief executive officer Aaron Gadiel said the government’s decision to allow the National Building and Jobs Taskforce to expire is a shame because it was the only approvals system that was “refreshing” in its approach to the housing supply and affordability issue.

The National Building and Jobs Taskforce was originally set up as a government stimulus initiative to boost the Australian economy. NSW’s share of funding under the plan was valued at over $7 billion including $1.5 billion to non-government schools. With the wind-down of the stimulus, no further categories for building projects have been added to the plan.

“These public servants took a common sense approach to housing approvals,” Mr Gadiel said.

“It’s particularly disappointing that there is now no prospect of the system being extended to private sector projects,” he said.

According to Mr Gadiel, NSW property development has been in serious decline since 2002.

Mr Gadiel said he had hoped the findings of Dr Neil Shepherd’s review into the Nation Building and Jobs Plan would shine a light on problems in the state’s planning system.

“Clearly, more time is required before a government moves decisively on this issue,” he said.

 

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