Rate hike off the cards for now

Minutes released by the Reserve Bank from its monetary policy meeting earlier this month reveal that the central bank may have relaxed its penchant for rising interest rates – for the time being.

According to the minutes, the central bank maintains its view that the economy will grow somewhat above trend over the next few years however economic indicators over the past month had not placed any urgency on the need to move on monetary policy yet.

The board also noted the ‘dual’ forces at work within the economy.

“While there had been additional evidence of the coming strong pick-up in investment in the resources sector, activity remained quite subdued in some other important parts of the economy, partly reflecting the board’s earlier actions as well as the appreciation of the exchange rate,” the minutes read.

The board acknowledged that credit growth remained moderate while international activity was posing downside risks to the economy, particularly sovereign debt problems in Europe.

“Members judged that it would be prudent to leave the stance of policy unchanged, pending further data on international developments and on the strength of domestic demand and inflationary pressures,” the minutes concluded.

The Reserve Bank kept the official cash rate on hold at 4.75 per cent for the seventh consecutive month when it met on June 7.

Indications of a pause will be met with relief from Australian investors and home buyers who have been hit rising living costs from all angles.

Minutes released by the Reserve Bank from its monetary policy meeting earlier this month reveal that the central bank may have relaxed its penchant for rising interest rates – for the time being.

According to the minutes, the central bank maintains its view that the economy will grow somewhat above trend over the next few years however economic indicators over the past month had not placed any urgency on the need to move on monetary policy yet.

The board also noted the ‘dual’ forces at work within the economy.

“While there had been additional evidence of the coming strong pick-up in investment in the resources sector, activity remained quite subdued in some other important parts of the economy, partly reflecting the board’s earlier actions as well as the appreciation of the exchange rate,” the minutes read.

The board acknowledged that credit growth remained moderate while international activity was posing downside risks to the economy, particularly sovereign debt problems in Europe.

“Members judged that it would be prudent to leave the stance of policy unchanged, pending further data on international developments and on the strength of domestic demand and inflationary pressures,” the minutes concluded.

The Reserve Bank kept the official cash rate on hold at 4.75 per cent for the seventh consecutive month when it met on June 7.

Indications of a pause will be met with relief from Australian investors and home buyers who have been hit rising living costs from all angles.

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