New 'accredited' agent laments easy courses

Simon Parker

While industry standards in the past decade have improved, one of the first agents to become a Real Estate Institute of NSW (REINSW) ‘accredited property specialist’ said changes in technology have made it “far easier” to secure a lisense to trade.

“Generally speaking, the level of skill and the standard of agents have increased over the past decade,” principal and sales director at Sydney-based Wilson Property, Adrian Wilson, told Real Estate Business.

“This is a result of tighter regulation from governing bodies, the mandatory CPD program and support from industry bodies such at the REINSW.

“The change in technology however, has made it is far easier to obtain certificate of practice than ever before, which is why it is crucial that qualified and experienced agents are recognised and identified as industry leaders.”

Mr Wilson said becoming an accredited property specialist under the REINSW scheme, which commenced earlier this year, would help him stand out from many of his competitors.

“The accreditation also gives agents an opportunity to demonstrate advanced skills and knowledge and, in Adrian’s case, is a reflection of his ability to go above and beyond for each client he works with,” a statement from Wilson Property said.

REINSW CEO Tim McKibbin agreed: “Accreditation gives agents a way to demonstrate to buyers and sellers their expertise and commitment to high standards. I commend Adrian Wilson for demonstrating a superior level of skills, expertise and service to his clients.”

The relatively new accreditation program, which covers 10 industry specialialties, comes as the industry continues to wait for the release of a draft outline of proposed national licensing legislation. Originally due for release in July, the Regulatory Impact Statement (RIS) was expected sometime in October. It has not been released.

The REINSW, along with its fellow state, territory and national real estate institute bodies, believe the Council of Australian Governments (COAG), the body responsible for the RIS, has plans to undermine industry training standards.

The REINSW said earlier this year that “the ludicrous practice of two-day entry-level professional training will sweep the nation, if the changes to the professional standards are introduced.”

The Council of Australian Governments (COAG) is developing a national licensing system across a range of licenced professions to remove inconsistencies between states and territories and to enhance consumer protection.

“What is really being proposed here is a significant attack on the profession’s training and education requirement in nearly every state in Australia,” REINSW President Wayne Stewart said in June.

Western Australia, the Northern Territory, Tasmania and South Australian all face a demonstrable reduction in the standard of learning from Diploma level to Certificate IV level. This will lower the professional standard.

“Why are they dragging everyone else down to a lower qualification level when it is clear that the consumer and agent all benefit from a higher standard of entry-level training?

“Instead of enhancing consumer confidence, the proposed new system may actually undermine it.

“It is beyond belief that in NSW a person can achieve the regulated education requirement in two days.”

According to the REINSW website, to become an accredited REINSW property sales specialist, the applicant must be an individual member of the REINSW, be employed by an REINSW full firm member agency, and have completed the compulsory CPD requirements prior to seeking accreditation.

The applicant must have held a current, valid real estate agent licence continuously for the past three years, have been practising in the industry as a licence holder for the past three years, or have held a current, valid real estate salesperson certificate of registration for the past five years and been practising in the industry as a certificate holder for the same period.

Applicants must also have spent a minimum of 80 per cent of their time working in the area of specialisation over the three years preceding the application.

Simon Parker

While industry standards in the past decade have improved, one of the first agents to become a Real Estate Institute of NSW (REINSW) ‘accredited property specialist’ said changes in technology have made it “far easier” to secure a lisense to trade.

“Generally speaking, the level of skill and the standard of agents have increased over the past decade,” principal and sales director at Sydney-based Wilson Property, Adrian Wilson, told Real Estate Business.

“This is a result of tighter regulation from governing bodies, the mandatory CPD program and support from industry bodies such at the REINSW.

“The change in technology however, has made it is far easier to obtain certificate of practice than ever before, which is why it is crucial that qualified and experienced agents are recognised and identified as industry leaders.”

Mr Wilson said becoming an accredited property specialist under the REINSW scheme, which commenced earlier this year, would help him stand out from many of his competitors.

“The accreditation also gives agents an opportunity to demonstrate advanced skills and knowledge and, in Adrian’s case, is a reflection of his ability to go above and beyond for each client he works with,” a statement from Wilson Property said.

REINSW CEO Tim McKibbin agreed: “Accreditation gives agents a way to demonstrate to buyers and sellers their expertise and commitment to high standards. I commend Adrian Wilson for demonstrating a superior level of skills, expertise and service to his clients.”

The relatively new accreditation program, which covers 10 industry specialialties, comes as the industry continues to wait for the release of a draft outline of proposed national licensing legislation. Originally due for release in July, the Regulatory Impact Statement (RIS) was expected sometime in October. It has not been released.

The REINSW, along with its fellow state, territory and national real estate institute bodies, believe the Council of Australian Governments (COAG), the body responsible for the RIS, has plans to undermine industry training standards.

The REINSW said earlier this year that “the ludicrous practice of two-day entry-level professional training will sweep the nation, if the changes to the professional standards are introduced.”

The Council of Australian Governments (COAG) is developing a national licensing system across a range of licenced professions to remove inconsistencies between states and territories and to enhance consumer protection.

“What is really being proposed here is a significant attack on the profession’s training and education requirement in nearly every state in Australia,” REINSW President Wayne Stewart said in June.

Western Australia, the Northern Territory, Tasmania and South Australian all face a demonstrable reduction in the standard of learning from Diploma level to Certificate IV level. This will lower the professional standard.

“Why are they dragging everyone else down to a lower qualification level when it is clear that the consumer and agent all benefit from a higher standard of entry-level training?

“Instead of enhancing consumer confidence, the proposed new system may actually undermine it.

“It is beyond belief that in NSW a person can achieve the regulated education requirement in two days.”

According to the REINSW website, to become an accredited REINSW property sales specialist, the applicant must be an individual member of the REINSW, be employed by an REINSW full firm member agency, and have completed the compulsory CPD requirements prior to seeking accreditation.

The applicant must have held a current, valid real estate agent licence continuously for the past three years, have been practising in the industry as a licence holder for the past three years, or have held a current, valid real estate salesperson certificate of registration for the past five years and been practising in the industry as a certificate holder for the same period.

Applicants must also have spent a minimum of 80 per cent of their time working in the area of specialisation over the three years preceding the application.

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