Agent updates listing presentations weekly

While two out of five agents update their listing presentation at least three times a year, one agent has gone above and beyond by changing it every week.

Lyn Kenny, from Ray White Lysterfield, in Victoria, bucks the stereotype of more experienced agents being set in their ways, and often changes her listing presentation.

Ms Kenny, a 28-year industry veteran, uses her iPad when meeting with clients, to provide a professional and tech savvy atmosphere. She believes having her tablet computer allows her to update her listing presentation easily and frequently, to supply her clients with up-to-date data on the market and house prices.

“It’s all very current and all visual with lots of evidence and figures in there. I’ve been using it now for a year or so,” Ms Kenny told Real Estate Business.

Ms Kenny's comments were in response to the latest Real Estate Business straw poll, which revealed that just over 40 per cent of respondents updated their listing presentation more than three times per year. The online poll, which was conducted between March 29 and April 18, also showed 42 per cent of the 202 respondents changed their presentation at least once per year, with the remainder (18 per cent) doing so every few years.

Mark McGill, from Amber Werchon Property Mooloolaba, in Queennsland, is very much on the flipside of the coin. “Because I don’t carry any props, I don’t need to change it at all,” he told Real Estate Business.

Mr McGill has a set structure on how to conduct the presentation, but said that keeping it simple and connecting with the client is key.

“I have four topics I try to cover, and if we can’t reach an agreement on the first one, then there’s no point me moving onto any of the other three.

“First thing I find out is their motivation, and then we discuss the market; what their expectations are and recent property sales in the area. Once we’ve agreed on that then I move onto method - auction or private treaty.

“But I won’t even begin those discussions if we can’t agree on where the property sits in the market.”

Mr McGill says that knowing when to call it quits is the most important skill. “Knowing when to walk away from business is vital, you need to learn that or else you’ll be working on a ton of 20 per cent over-priced stock and you’ll get no pay.”

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