Winter ideal time to sell property

Staff Reporter

Vendors are being encouraged by a real estate group to use the ‘quieter’ winter period as an opportune time to sell their property.

“Generally, sales volumes are down by as much as 20 per centin the colder months as a result of fewer homes for sale, however this doesn’t necessarily mean there is a smaller pool of motivated buyers,” said Angus Raine, CEO of Raine & Horne.

“Typically, owners tend to hold out for a spring sale, as the collective wisdom suggests that a home will present better in the warmer months.

“However this isn’t always true, and in many cases the cooler months enable a property to show off its very best features.”

Raine & Horne said vendors looking to sell before September should keep a few things in mind.

“For example, selling in winter is viable if your home has plenty of natural light,” Mr Raine said.

“Likewise, a sun-drenched interior is certain to move your home up the pecking order and may prove a significant tick in the box with many buyers.”

Paul Pettenon, principal of Raine & Horne Concord, in Sydney’s inner west, said north-facing yards and/or deciduous trees helped vendors sell their property.

“A deciduous tree’s canopy works well to shade a yard during spring and summer, but on the flipside, in the colder months, the sunlight streaming through the bare branches can actually brighten and warm the back of the house,” Mr Pettenon said.

On the mid north coast, Christine Clarke, principal of Raine & Horne Coffs Harbour, on NSW’s mid-north coast, said winter was often the best time to sell a home in her town.

“Winter is actually one of the most pleasant seasons in Coffs Harbour and we are finding that buyer numbers don’t really diminish at all during the more temperate months,” Ms Clarke said.

Ms Clarke also said that a proportion of winter buyers originally migrate to Coffs Harbour as tenants.

“Often they arrive on the Coffs Coast in the summer and stay on permanently after their lease expires, a trend which is then reflected by a spike in buying activity in the winter months,” she said.

Staff Reporter

Vendors are being encouraged by a real estate group to use the ‘quieter’ winter period as an opportune time to sell their property.

“Generally, sales volumes are down by as much as 20 per centin the colder months as a result of fewer homes for sale, however this doesn’t necessarily mean there is a smaller pool of motivated buyers,” said Angus Raine, CEO of Raine & Horne.

“Typically, owners tend to hold out for a spring sale, as the collective wisdom suggests that a home will present better in the warmer months.

“However this isn’t always true, and in many cases the cooler months enable a property to show off its very best features.”

Raine & Horne said vendors looking to sell before September should keep a few things in mind.

“For example, selling in winter is viable if your home has plenty of natural light,” Mr Raine said.

“Likewise, a sun-drenched interior is certain to move your home up the pecking order and may prove a significant tick in the box with many buyers.”

Paul Pettenon, principal of Raine & Horne Concord, in Sydney’s inner west, said north-facing yards and/or deciduous trees helped vendors sell their property.

“A deciduous tree’s canopy works well to shade a yard during spring and summer, but on the flipside, in the colder months, the sunlight streaming through the bare branches can actually brighten and warm the back of the house,” Mr Pettenon said.

On the mid north coast, Christine Clarke, principal of Raine & Horne Coffs Harbour, on NSW’s mid-north coast, said winter was often the best time to sell a home in her town.

“Winter is actually one of the most pleasant seasons in Coffs Harbour and we are finding that buyer numbers don’t really diminish at all during the more temperate months,” Ms Clarke said.

Ms Clarke also said that a proportion of winter buyers originally migrate to Coffs Harbour as tenants.

“Often they arrive on the Coffs Coast in the summer and stay on permanently after their lease expires, a trend which is then reflected by a spike in buying activity in the winter months,” she said.

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