Review reveals most common strata complaints

Staff Reporter

Noise, parking and anti-social behaviour were the most common issues raised by the public as part of a community review of strata and community title laws in NSW.

“From smoking in common spaces to the operation of executive committees, the overwhelming response from the community tells us there’s significant need for reform,” NSW Fair Trading minister Anthony Roberts said earlier this week.

“The forum received 19,138 visits from 13,558 individual visitors; 1,230 individual comments were received and close to 600 suggestions for procedural change or law reform were submitted,” he continued. 

“Submissions expressed concern about the facilities for disabled people and the challenges of short-term rentals right through to the use of pianos and leaf-blowers.

“In December last year we asked strata and community scheme owners, executive committees, building managers and agents, tenants and other interested people to contribute to the debate to reform the laws governing these schemes,” the minister said.

“The challenges of community living have altered as strata and community schemes respond to factors including changing demographics, increased urban densities and the complexity of large scale, modern developments.”

Mr Roberts said a review of the laws was well overdue.

“The world’s first strata scheme commenced in 1961 and was a two story, eight apartment development.  It is very different from the developments with hundreds of apartments, gyms, commercial outlets and other considerations that modern developments need to manage.

“Over 50 years later, we also need to face up to the challenges such as ageing building stock and the reality that some schemes will need to be terminated."

“The government is currently developing a discussion paper on strata and community title laws for release mid-year.  Our goal is to work with the community to develop laws which serve us for another 50 years.”

Staff Reporter

Noise, parking and anti-social behaviour were the most common issues raised by the public as part of a community review of strata and community title laws in NSW.

“From smoking in common spaces to the operation of executive committees, the overwhelming response from the community tells us there’s significant need for reform,” NSW Fair Trading minister Anthony Roberts said earlier this week.

“The forum received 19,138 visits from 13,558 individual visitors; 1,230 individual comments were received and close to 600 suggestions for procedural change or law reform were submitted,” he continued. 

“Submissions expressed concern about the facilities for disabled people and the challenges of short-term rentals right through to the use of pianos and leaf-blowers.

“In December last year we asked strata and community scheme owners, executive committees, building managers and agents, tenants and other interested people to contribute to the debate to reform the laws governing these schemes,” the minister said.

“The challenges of community living have altered as strata and community schemes respond to factors including changing demographics, increased urban densities and the complexity of large scale, modern developments.”

Mr Roberts said a review of the laws was well overdue.

“The world’s first strata scheme commenced in 1961 and was a two story, eight apartment development.  It is very different from the developments with hundreds of apartments, gyms, commercial outlets and other considerations that modern developments need to manage.

“Over 50 years later, we also need to face up to the challenges such as ageing building stock and the reality that some schemes will need to be terminated."

“The government is currently developing a discussion paper on strata and community title laws for release mid-year.  Our goal is to work with the community to develop laws which serve us for another 50 years.”

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