Worst mobile, online behaviours revealed

Staff Reporter

Mobile phone and online behaviour is deteriorating, a new survey has found.

The Mobile Etiquette and Digital Sharing survey, conducted on behalf of Intel in the U.S., revealed that while digital sharing on mobile devices helped people stay connected to others, the tendency to perhaps share too much information can annoy some people.

“What it means to be 'digital' is something we are all having to negotiate,” said Intel Fellow Dr. Genevieve Bell, director of user interaction and experience at Intel Labs.

“The latest Intel Mobile Etiquette survey highlights the fact that people are still grappling with how to balance the benefits of mobile technology with the downsides – this means we all still have those moments of poor mobile manners.”

U.S. adults reported the following digital sharing behaviors as top pet peeves: people who constantly complain (59 per cent), people who post inappropriate/explicit photos (55 per cent), and people who share information that they would consider private (53 per cent).

The report showed 85 per cent of U.S. adults now share information online, with one-quarter of U.S. adults sharing information at least once a day.  
Almost one of four said they feel they are missing out when they are not able to share or consume information online.

Intel said that survey respondents stated that they wish people thought more about how others perceive them when reading shared information online, and how this can cause people to form opinions based on a person's online personality and sharing behavior.

Four out of 10 U.S. adults reported that they typically choose not to associate with people whose opinions they disagree with online.

More than one-quarter of respondents (27 per cent) stated that they are an open book —both in person and online — and that there is very little they would not share online, while one-third of respondents to the Mobile Etiquette survey said they are more comfortable sharing information online than in person.

The survey also revealed that most (81 per cent) believed that mobile manners are becoming worse (compared to 75 per cent of U.S. adults surveyed a year ago), and 92 per cent of U.S. adults wish people practiced better mobile etiquette in public.

As a follow up to Intel's Mobile Etiquette surveys in 2009 and 2011, U.S. adults continue to report that the top three pet peeves are texting or typing while driving a car (77 per cent), talking on a device loudly in a public place (64 per cent), and having the volume too loud in a public place (55 per cent).

The survey was conducted online within the U.S. by Ipsos Observer on behalf of Intel from March 1-16, 2012 among a nationally representative sample of 2,008 U.S. adults aged 18 and older.

Staff Reporter

Mobile phone and online behaviour is deteriorating, a new survey has found.

The Mobile Etiquette and Digital Sharing survey, conducted on behalf of Intel in the U.S., revealed that while digital sharing on mobile devices helped people stay connected to others, the tendency to perhaps share too much information can annoy some people.

“What it means to be 'digital' is something we are all having to negotiate,” said Intel Fellow Dr. Genevieve Bell, director of user interaction and experience at Intel Labs.

“The latest Intel Mobile Etiquette survey highlights the fact that people are still grappling with how to balance the benefits of mobile technology with the downsides – this means we all still have those moments of poor mobile manners.”

U.S. adults reported the following digital sharing behaviors as top pet peeves: people who constantly complain (59 per cent), people who post inappropriate/explicit photos (55 per cent), and people who share information that they would consider private (53 per cent).

The report showed 85 per cent of U.S. adults now share information online, with one-quarter of U.S. adults sharing information at least once a day.  
Almost one of four said they feel they are missing out when they are not able to share or consume information online.

Intel said that survey respondents stated that they wish people thought more about how others perceive them when reading shared information online, and how this can cause people to form opinions based on a person's online personality and sharing behavior.

Four out of 10 U.S. adults reported that they typically choose not to associate with people whose opinions they disagree with online.

More than one-quarter of respondents (27 per cent) stated that they are an open book —both in person and online — and that there is very little they would not share online, while one-third of respondents to the Mobile Etiquette survey said they are more comfortable sharing information online than in person.

The survey also revealed that most (81 per cent) believed that mobile manners are becoming worse (compared to 75 per cent of U.S. adults surveyed a year ago), and 92 per cent of U.S. adults wish people practiced better mobile etiquette in public.

As a follow up to Intel's Mobile Etiquette surveys in 2009 and 2011, U.S. adults continue to report that the top three pet peeves are texting or typing while driving a car (77 per cent), talking on a device loudly in a public place (64 per cent), and having the volume too loud in a public place (55 per cent).

The survey was conducted online within the U.S. by Ipsos Observer on behalf of Intel from March 1-16, 2012 among a nationally representative sample of 2,008 U.S. adults aged 18 and older.

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