Sales sweet talk loses listings: Phegan

Steven Cross

Lose the sweet-talking and rehearsed salesperson persona if you don't want potential clients using price as the basis for their listing decision, prominent real estate industry trainer told attendees at a property management conference.

Speaking at Australian Residential Property Management (ARPM) 2012 in Sydney on the weekend, Josh Phegan revealed what he believed to be the ‘ultimate listing presentation’.

“Humans are designed to say no … the moment you become a salesperson, you lose the sale," he told the more than 400 attendees on Sunday.

"When it looks rehearsed for the customer, is the moment the customer turns off."

Mr Phegan said empathising with a client and their needs will almost certainly make you stick out from the crowd.

“We often don’t think about the customer and their expectations," he continued. "If we don’t get better at what we do, we’re going to become redundant."

“In this technological world of expansion, people are feeling less like individuals among the thousands of others around them. But people are craving a deep, deep human connection."

Mr Phegan shared results from a survey which revealed that 65 per cent of customers believe the list of prices is the most informative page on any company’s website.

“When it comes to the listing presentation, in the absence of a differentiation, the customer will always shop [based] on price, and often regret not choosing the expensive choice later on,” he said.

Other tips he shared with conference attendees included:

  • Identify ALL the customer’s needs; if you can find out the need of the client, you can sell the features and benefits
  • Use the customer’s language. If they use words like ‘security’ when describing their needs, note that down and use the exact same word when selling the features and benefits
  • Be the safer option. If there is an element of risk, the customer will always choose the safer option
  • Find out about their previous property manager, get them as emotional as possible
  • Give them coaching about how to leave an agency
  • If you come to a disagreement, a way to find some middle ground is with phrases like ‘If I...' and 'Will you…’; that way you can get permission before you do the work

Steven Cross

Lose the sweet-talking and rehearsed salesperson persona if you don't want potential clients using price as the basis for their listing decision, prominent real estate industry trainer told attendees at a property management conference.

Speaking at Australian Residential Property Management (ARPM) 2012 in Sydney on the weekend, Josh Phegan revealed what he believed to be the ‘ultimate listing presentation’.

“Humans are designed to say no … the moment you become a salesperson, you lose the sale," he told the more than 400 attendees on Sunday.

"When it looks rehearsed for the customer, is the moment the customer turns off."

Mr Phegan said empathising with a client and their needs will almost certainly make you stick out from the crowd.

“We often don’t think about the customer and their expectations," he continued. "If we don’t get better at what we do, we’re going to become redundant."

“In this technological world of expansion, people are feeling less like individuals among the thousands of others around them. But people are craving a deep, deep human connection."

Mr Phegan shared results from a survey which revealed that 65 per cent of customers believe the list of prices is the most informative page on any company’s website.

“When it comes to the listing presentation, in the absence of a differentiation, the customer will always shop [based] on price, and often regret not choosing the expensive choice later on,” he said.

Other tips he shared with conference attendees included:

  • Identify ALL the customer’s needs; if you can find out the need of the client, you can sell the features and benefits
  • Use the customer’s language. If they use words like ‘security’ when describing their needs, note that down and use the exact same word when selling the features and benefits
  • Be the safer option. If there is an element of risk, the customer will always choose the safer option
  • Find out about their previous property manager, get them as emotional as possible
  • Give them coaching about how to leave an agency
  • If you come to a disagreement, a way to find some middle ground is with phrases like ‘If I...' and 'Will you…’; that way you can get permission before you do the work
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