Online tool shows current, future flight paths

Staff Reporter

The often deafening groan from aircraft, long the bane of many a homeowner, should be easier to avoid in Brisbane following the launch of online tools that reveal current and future flight paths.

The agreement, struck between the Real Estate Institute of Queensland (REIQ) and Brisbane Airport Corporation (BAC), will see the two organisations jointly promote online tools that outline current flights paths and noise levels, in addition to future flight paths and areas of higher aircraft noise.

“It’s no secret that buying a property for residential or investment purposes is one of the most intensive and stressful things a person can do,” BAC CEO and managing director Julieanne Alroe said. “The last thing we want to see is someone going through that process, only to find that they are not aware of a current or future flight path.

“We have worked very hard with Air Services Australia to find ways to demonstrate current and predicted aircraft noise levels in Brisbane suburbs and REIQ has provided us with an opportunity to educate people when it matters most.”

REIQ CEO Anton Kardash said the partnership was another example of the REIQ, which celebrates its 95th anniversary next year, working to better educate consumers.

“Information about flight paths will be available on reiq.com, which features nearly 100,000 property listings from REIQ accredited agencies only, which provides peace of mind to buyers during the search for their next home or investment,” he said.

The agreement comes shortly after the NSW government found itself embroiled in a controversy over plans to develop 2,000 homes near Canberra Airport. Canberra Airport managing director Stephen Byron told the Canberra Times today that despite government claims to the contrary, the planned development would be hit by aircraft noise, and would restrict the airport's ability to expand in the future.

Through its public forums and via the Brisbane Airport Community Aviation Consultation Group (BACACG), BAC said it has received feedback from some Brisbane residents who were unaware of regular aircraft noise before they purchased property.

The two main tools available today are web-based and can be used without any knowledge of aviation, the organisations said.

Staff Reporter

The often deafening groan from aircraft, long the bane of many a homeowner, should be easier to avoid in Brisbane following the launch of online tools that reveal current and future flight paths.

The agreement, struck between the Real Estate Institute of Queensland (REIQ) and Brisbane Airport Corporation (BAC), will see the two organisations jointly promote online tools that outline current flights paths and noise levels, in addition to future flight paths and areas of higher aircraft noise.

“It’s no secret that buying a property for residential or investment purposes is one of the most intensive and stressful things a person can do,” BAC CEO and managing director Julieanne Alroe said. “The last thing we want to see is someone going through that process, only to find that they are not aware of a current or future flight path.

“We have worked very hard with Air Services Australia to find ways to demonstrate current and predicted aircraft noise levels in Brisbane suburbs and REIQ has provided us with an opportunity to educate people when it matters most.”

REIQ CEO Anton Kardash said the partnership was another example of the REIQ, which celebrates its 95th anniversary next year, working to better educate consumers.

“Information about flight paths will be available on reiq.com, which features nearly 100,000 property listings from REIQ accredited agencies only, which provides peace of mind to buyers during the search for their next home or investment,” he said.

The agreement comes shortly after the NSW government found itself embroiled in a controversy over plans to develop 2,000 homes near Canberra Airport. Canberra Airport managing director Stephen Byron told the Canberra Times today that despite government claims to the contrary, the planned development would be hit by aircraft noise, and would restrict the airport's ability to expand in the future.

Through its public forums and via the Brisbane Airport Community Aviation Consultation Group (BACACG), BAC said it has received feedback from some Brisbane residents who were unaware of regular aircraft noise before they purchased property.

The two main tools available today are web-based and can be used without any knowledge of aviation, the organisations said.

promoted stories

REB Events