C21 helps save unwanted building materials

Staff Reporter

An online marketplace which allows people to purchase, sell and dispose of unwanted building materials and products is being backed by CENTURY 21 Australia.

“Thousands of people that buy properties through CENTURY 21 each year go on to renovate them, and this revolutionary technology allows our customers to both buy building items at low costs and monetise excess items from their renovation projects,” said chairman and owner of CENTURY 21 Australasia, Charles Tarbey, in relation to the ‘BuildBITS’ initiative.

“BuildBITS also gives users the ability to reduce landfill by finding a home for many products that might otherwise be thrown out as garbage.”

Mr Tarbey, whose group has an exclusive agreement with BuildBITS, hopes the online market grows large enough to be self-perpetuating.

The initiative has some similarities with Heart for the Homeless, which links tenants and homeowners who are moving with charities that can collect unwanted household goods. A free initiative, it relies on agents and property managers – who are often best placed to know when people are planning to move – to help promote the service to clients and prospective buyers and/or tenants.

BuildBITS is the invention of Western Sydney builder, Neil Turrell, and his wife Leisa, who were tired of seeing reusable building materials being taken off to the tip to the detriment of the environment and clients, who often had to pay hefty disposal fees.

“CENTURY 21 is the world’s largest real estate sales company and we are delighted to be able to partner with them to promote the BuildBITS service offering,” said Neil Turrell.

Other companies supporting the initiative include Kennards Hire, CSR, Trend Windows, Actron Air Conditioning, Clarendon Homes, Narrellan Pools and Bendigo Bank.

The BuildBITS website is free to use and there are no commissions paid on selling or buying, the company said.

Staff Reporter

An online marketplace which allows people to purchase, sell and dispose of unwanted building materials and products is being backed by CENTURY 21 Australia.

“Thousands of people that buy properties through CENTURY 21 each year go on to renovate them, and this revolutionary technology allows our customers to both buy building items at low costs and monetise excess items from their renovation projects,” said chairman and owner of CENTURY 21 Australasia, Charles Tarbey, in relation to the ‘BuildBITS’ initiative.

“BuildBITS also gives users the ability to reduce landfill by finding a home for many products that might otherwise be thrown out as garbage.”

Mr Tarbey, whose group has an exclusive agreement with BuildBITS, hopes the online market grows large enough to be self-perpetuating.

The initiative has some similarities with Heart for the Homeless, which links tenants and homeowners who are moving with charities that can collect unwanted household goods. A free initiative, it relies on agents and property managers – who are often best placed to know when people are planning to move – to help promote the service to clients and prospective buyers and/or tenants.

BuildBITS is the invention of Western Sydney builder, Neil Turrell, and his wife Leisa, who were tired of seeing reusable building materials being taken off to the tip to the detriment of the environment and clients, who often had to pay hefty disposal fees.

“CENTURY 21 is the world’s largest real estate sales company and we are delighted to be able to partner with them to promote the BuildBITS service offering,” said Neil Turrell.

Other companies supporting the initiative include Kennards Hire, CSR, Trend Windows, Actron Air Conditioning, Clarendon Homes, Narrellan Pools and Bendigo Bank.

The BuildBITS website is free to use and there are no commissions paid on selling or buying, the company said.

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