#on hold# Office-dwellers losing business

Staff Reporter

Agents spend too much time in the office and allow leads to ‘go cold’ through poor communication, a top agent has claimed.

Despite Tracey Smith of Elders Gladstone only working in the industry since 2011, she has received numerous top gongs, including National Outstanding New Talent and Number Two Salesperson for Elders.

"Most agents spend too much time in the office," she said. "Leads go cold too quickly when they aren't based on a real connection.”

Ms Smith established this as her point of difference from the get-go, and according to her it’s paid off.

“I asked myself, ‘What do people want from me?’ I concluded that they want someone who is honest, trustworthy and accountable.

“Nothing but the bleeding obvious there, I know. But the real insight came with the follow up question, 'How can I demonstrate these values in a way that my peers aren’t?’”

When Smith looked at her social life, she realised that if she ever needed a plumber, gardener or cook, she could just ask her network of friends to recommend one. And she would trust them because they were part of the social fabric of her community. 

"Here was my answer," she says. "I should be an active contributor to the community, a genuine good neighbour who contributes and not a salesperson whose face is only seen when the smell of a sale is in the air.

"Getting involved allowed people to get to know me as a person without the defensive sales-person wall coming up," she says. 

"It felt good to put my energy into bettering the community in which my family and friends live, work and play," she said.

Ms Smith will be speaking at the Ideas Exchange conference in Melbourne, Sydney and Brisbane next month.

Staff Reporter

Agents spend too much time in the office and allow leads to ‘go cold’ through poor communication, a top agent has claimed.

Despite Tracey Smith of Elders Gladstone only working in the industry since 2011, she has received numerous top gongs, including National Outstanding New Talent and Number Two Salesperson for Elders.

"Most agents spend too much time in the office," she said. "Leads go cold too quickly when they aren't based on a real connection.”

Ms Smith established this as her point of difference from the get-go, and according to her it’s paid off.

“I asked myself, ‘What do people want from me?’ I concluded that they want someone who is honest, trustworthy and accountable.

“Nothing but the bleeding obvious there, I know. But the real insight came with the follow up question, 'How can I demonstrate these values in a way that my peers aren’t?’”

When Smith looked at her social life, she realised that if she ever needed a plumber, gardener or cook, she could just ask her network of friends to recommend one. And she would trust them because they were part of the social fabric of her community. 

"Here was my answer," she says. "I should be an active contributor to the community, a genuine good neighbour who contributes and not a salesperson whose face is only seen when the smell of a sale is in the air.

"Getting involved allowed people to get to know me as a person without the defensive sales-person wall coming up," she says. 

"It felt good to put my energy into bettering the community in which my family and friends live, work and play," she said.

Ms Smith will be speaking at the Ideas Exchange conference in Melbourne, Sydney and Brisbane next month.

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