More Aussies optimistic about economy post-election

An international study has found Australians are more positive about the economy following the federal election.

The latest Ipsos Global @dvisor The Economic Pulse of the World report found there had been an increase in optimism amongst Australians.

Globally, the Ipsos study reported a “steady ship” in terms of people’s view of their country’s national economic situation, with 36 per cent rating it as 'good'.

The survey was conducted in 24 countries with a total of 18,041 respondents. Consumers were asked to describe the macroeconomic state of their country, the state of their local economy and a six-month outlook for their local economy.

The survey found that among the 15 developed countries, there was a continuation of the modest upward trend in optimism, which has occurred over the last 10 to 12 months.

In November 2012, 27 per cent of respondents globally rated their country’s national economic situation as ‘good’, whereas in the latest study in September 2013, 33 per cent gave the same assessment.

Australia ranked fifth (62 per cent), behind Saudi Arabia (87 per cent), which remained at the top in terms of optimism, followed by Sweden (71 per cent), Germany (69 per cent) and Canada (64 per cent).

Ipsos Australia Public Affairs director David Elliott said: “Interestingly, in this first post-election wave of our global survey we saw an improved optimism from Australians, with an increase of six per cent in the proportion giving our national economic situation a rating of ‘good’.”

When asked to rate their local economic situation, Australia was just outside the top five, in sixth position, with 38 per cent rating their local area as 'strong'.

The top five countries for local economy were Saudi Arabia (57 per cent), Germany (50 per cent), Sweden (50 per cent), China (46 per cent) and Canada (44 per cent).

“Whilst there was only a modest increase in this measure post-election, up one per cent, we did see an increase in optimism regarding Australians’ belief that their local economy will be stronger in six months from now, with this measure increasing from 19 per cent in August to 29 per cent in September after the election,” Mr Elliot said.

“This was by far the largest increase in local optimism, with Spain recording the next biggest increase, up four per cent to 21 per cent."

An international study has found Australians are more positive about the economy following the federal election.

The latest Ipsos Global @dvisor The Economic Pulse of the World report found there had been an increase in optimism amongst Australians.

Globally, the Ipsos study reported a “steady ship” in terms of people’s view of their country’s national economic situation, with 36 per cent rating it as 'good'.

The survey was conducted in 24 countries with a total of 18,041 respondents. Consumers were asked to describe the macroeconomic state of their country, the state of their local economy and a six-month outlook for their local economy.

The survey found that among the 15 developed countries, there was a continuation of the modest upward trend in optimism, which has occurred over the last 10 to 12 months.

In November 2012, 27 per cent of respondents globally rated their country’s national economic situation as ‘good’, whereas in the latest study in September 2013, 33 per cent gave the same assessment.

Australia ranked fifth (62 per cent), behind Saudi Arabia (87 per cent), which remained at the top in terms of optimism, followed by Sweden (71 per cent), Germany (69 per cent) and Canada (64 per cent).

Ipsos Australia Public Affairs director David Elliott said: “Interestingly, in this first post-election wave of our global survey we saw an improved optimism from Australians, with an increase of six per cent in the proportion giving our national economic situation a rating of ‘good’.”

When asked to rate their local economic situation, Australia was just outside the top five, in sixth position, with 38 per cent rating their local area as 'strong'.

The top five countries for local economy were Saudi Arabia (57 per cent), Germany (50 per cent), Sweden (50 per cent), China (46 per cent) and Canada (44 per cent).

“Whilst there was only a modest increase in this measure post-election, up one per cent, we did see an increase in optimism regarding Australians’ belief that their local economy will be stronger in six months from now, with this measure increasing from 19 per cent in August to 29 per cent in September after the election,” Mr Elliot said.

“This was by far the largest increase in local optimism, with Spain recording the next biggest increase, up four per cent to 21 per cent."

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