New digital signboards promise sales revolution

Staff Reporter

An outdoor advertising company is predicting a “revolutionary change” in real estate marketing with the introduction of new digital signboards.

CODY LIVE, which first announced its digital display signs in August this year, is about to commence prototype trials of its CODY LIVE real estate boards around Sydney.

The outdoor advertising company hopes to demonstrate that the digital signs will be a practical and highly advanced alternative to standard static real estate boards.

Standing at 173cm with a width of 61cm, the wireless CODY LIVE signs are illuminated by LCD screens to ensure property details stand out in high resolution in all forms of weather, at any time of day.

Selling agents can alter and update information in accordance with the needs of individual marketing campaigns.

The reuseable signs will be available on a rental basis at a price comparable to a traditional board.

The signs will come with a built-in CCTV camera, alarms and GPS units to minimise theft and vandalism. They also have inbuilt timers to shut down at night when viewings are limited.

CODY LIVE CEO Pierce Cody said the plan was to have the signs available for mass use from next year, once prototype tests have concluded in January.

“CODY LIVE is a dynamic and cost-effective advancement that will change the face of how real estate is marketed,” he said.

“After just a few seconds looking at the stunning visual quality of a CODY LIVE sign, you can be forgiven for thinking traditional static signs are antiquated and boring.

"CODY LIVE takes the business of connecting buyers with properties to a whole new level. The signs grab buyer interest early and hold buyer attention for longer.

“This is an obvious evolution from old-style static boards to a modern alterative – just like the migration from newspapers to tablet computers.”

Mr Cody said feedback from preliminary briefings with the nation’s top real estate agents was overwhelmingly positive.

Real Estate Institute of New South Wales CEO Tim McKibbin said progress with the digital signboards would be watched closely.

“Consumers are constantly seeking improvements in the quality and delivery of information to assist with their property decisions and acquisitions," he said.

“Technology advancements are constantly under pressure to respond to consumer demands in this area.

“It’s therefore no surprise the traditional signboard as a provider of information has to evolve to respond to consumer expectation.”

The company has engaged community consultation and research agencies to help road test the signs with local communities and government authorities.

Planning rules in many parts of Australia require development consent from local authorities to erect such signs as they are illuminated.

CODY LIVE is asking planning decision makers to treat the signs as traditional real estate signs that don’t require development consent.

“It would be costly, time consuming and unsustainable for the real estate industry and local councils if resources were tied up considering development applications for modern real estate agents,” Mr Cody said.

“We are ready to demonstrate that CODY LIVE signs offer massive benefits with no adverse impacts on local amenities.

“Current planning rules predate this technology and it’s important the rules are adjusted to keep up.”

Staff Reporter

An outdoor advertising company is predicting a “revolutionary change” in real estate marketing with the introduction of new digital signboards.

CODY LIVE, which first announced its digital display signs in August this year, is about to commence prototype trials of its CODY LIVE real estate boards around Sydney.

The outdoor advertising company hopes to demonstrate that the digital signs will be a practical and highly advanced alternative to standard static real estate boards.

Standing at 173cm with a width of 61cm, the wireless CODY LIVE signs are illuminated by LCD screens to ensure property details stand out in high resolution in all forms of weather, at any time of day.

Selling agents can alter and update information in accordance with the needs of individual marketing campaigns.

The reuseable signs will be available on a rental basis at a price comparable to a traditional board.

The signs will come with a built-in CCTV camera, alarms and GPS units to minimise theft and vandalism. They also have inbuilt timers to shut down at night when viewings are limited.

CODY LIVE CEO Pierce Cody said the plan was to have the signs available for mass use from next year, once prototype tests have concluded in January.

“CODY LIVE is a dynamic and cost-effective advancement that will change the face of how real estate is marketed,” he said.

“After just a few seconds looking at the stunning visual quality of a CODY LIVE sign, you can be forgiven for thinking traditional static signs are antiquated and boring.

"CODY LIVE takes the business of connecting buyers with properties to a whole new level. The signs grab buyer interest early and hold buyer attention for longer.

“This is an obvious evolution from old-style static boards to a modern alterative – just like the migration from newspapers to tablet computers.”

Mr Cody said feedback from preliminary briefings with the nation’s top real estate agents was overwhelmingly positive.

Real Estate Institute of New South Wales CEO Tim McKibbin said progress with the digital signboards would be watched closely.

“Consumers are constantly seeking improvements in the quality and delivery of information to assist with their property decisions and acquisitions," he said.

“Technology advancements are constantly under pressure to respond to consumer demands in this area.

“It’s therefore no surprise the traditional signboard as a provider of information has to evolve to respond to consumer expectation.”

The company has engaged community consultation and research agencies to help road test the signs with local communities and government authorities.

Planning rules in many parts of Australia require development consent from local authorities to erect such signs as they are illuminated.

CODY LIVE is asking planning decision makers to treat the signs as traditional real estate signs that don’t require development consent.

“It would be costly, time consuming and unsustainable for the real estate industry and local councils if resources were tied up considering development applications for modern real estate agents,” Mr Cody said.

“We are ready to demonstrate that CODY LIVE signs offer massive benefits with no adverse impacts on local amenities.

“Current planning rules predate this technology and it’s important the rules are adjusted to keep up.”

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