Delinquent borrowers face receivership: CBRE

Delinquent borrowers face receivership: CBRE

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Staff Reporter

More than $1 billion worth of distressed property has currently been forced on the market with more to come from ‘mum and dad’ investors, according to a major recovery real estate agency.

Development sites breaching bank’s borrowing rules are increasingly being pushed into receivership with more to come in two to three years, said CBRE Australia.

CBRE Private Client Group executive managing director Scott Gray-Spencer said: “We’re seeing the beginning of the next wave involving development sites and assets previously controlled by ‘mum and dad’ investors who used property as collateral to underpin their business interests.”

Previous approaches from banks have now become more conservative, and forced sales are being pushed, Mr Gray-Spencer said.

“These non-income producing properties have been a bane for the banks and while some have been willing to overlook loan-to-valuation ratios if the borrower is servicing their debt, they are now taking a harder line.”

Queensland, some parts of regional New South Wales, and coastal sites have so far been the hardest hit, he said.

Much of the $1 billion includes undeveloped greenfield sites.

Staff Reporter

More than $1 billion worth of distressed property has currently been forced on the market with more to come from ‘mum and dad’ investors, according to a major recovery real estate agency.

Development sites breaching bank’s borrowing rules are increasingly being pushed into receivership with more to come in two to three years, said CBRE Australia.

CBRE Private Client Group executive managing director Scott Gray-Spencer said: “We’re seeing the beginning of the next wave involving development sites and assets previously controlled by ‘mum and dad’ investors who used property as collateral to underpin their business interests.”

Previous approaches from banks have now become more conservative, and forced sales are being pushed, Mr Gray-Spencer said.

“These non-income producing properties have been a bane for the banks and while some have been willing to overlook loan-to-valuation ratios if the borrower is servicing their debt, they are now taking a harder line.”

Queensland, some parts of regional New South Wales, and coastal sites have so far been the hardest hit, he said.

Much of the $1 billion includes undeveloped greenfield sites.

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